Sunday, August 7, 2016

iPhone 7 guesses

OK, a prediction I haven't seen elsewhere:

iPhone 6/6s has had the same "@2x Retina" screen quality that first came out in the iPhone 4 with 326 pixels per inch.  

The 6 Plus and 6s Plus upped that with a "@3x Retina" screen with 401 pixels per inch.

Not sure if the bigger 7 Plus will go up to a 4x Retina and 535 pixels per inch, but I'm predicting the 7 will bump up its screen to a "@3x Retina" with 489 pixels per inch.*  Better screen, faster, better camera are always good enough reasons for people to upgrade.

(And that's on top of what others have guessed with be a Higher Color Range screen.)


* Exactly how it does the 6 Plus screen does scaling is a little different, that's why its 3x and iPhone 6's potential 3x aren't the same.

Saturday, August 6, 2016

Apple Watch 2 Guesses

Yeah, the usual thinner and more powerful...


The watch really does notifications best.  Those are a tiny amount of actual content with nice graphical wrappers and animations.  

My wife and I often communicate in single letters and emoji.  "U"  "K"  "👐"

I predict the Watch 2 will have a very custom Cell Phone chip to do notifications.  Super low power, and optimized for receiving small amounts of data -- sent via either Apple's push notification service or text message and that's it.  According to ancient FAQs, old school Pagers had very long battery life, measured in weeks or months on a AAA battery.    

Hopefully Apple has the clout to either have it included in your cell phone plan, or baked into the cost of the watch so there's no monthly fee.


* Highly compressed voice for Siri is the biggest possible thing it might send.  Looking a few minutes at the compression Siri uses, 10 seconds of audio could be about 5K to send, so very small too.  Definitely something Apple could do.

Saturday, September 5, 2015

Force Touch

When I checked out one of the new MacBooks, I knew that pressing the trackpad wasn't really clicking physically, but simulating it.  But my fingers couldn't tell the difference.

The Apple Watch does other interesting touch "feelings".  Taps when you get a message.  Try to scroll beyond the end of a list with the crown and there's a bouncy feel as it snaps back.

It's pretty positive that will be added to the new iPhones next week.  I think everyone is thinking about the "Force" part of it, missing the "Touch" part when it comes to iPhones.

Buttons that have a "click" feel when you press.
Lists that bounce back when you drag them too far.
Photos that give a "stretchy" feedback as you zoom in.

Games get interesting too, pieces that "click" into place as you drag them.

Hopefully the "taptic" hardware can simulate all sorts of interesting feedbacks.


UPDATE:  Nope.

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Playing the App Store lottery

There are so many existing apps, plus all the new ones, that writing apps really is like playing the lottery these days.

A new game has an nearly 100% chance of only ever making enough money for a cup of coffee.  It has a small chance of making enough to buy a car.  And a tiny chance of making enough to buy a house, or even a small island.  (There are 1 million apps, top 100 least are the house or island category--1 in 10,000 odds.  The top few are in the by a "large island" category.)

I saw a report (and promptly forgot where) that about 12,000 new games come out each month.

That's 3,000 a week.  

Apple features some of those new games each week.  And that's really all that matters.  Unless you have a lot of money to spend on ads, get very lucky, or do shady things like buying downloads, being one of those featured games is the only path to success.

Right now, Apple features about 15.  And they do want to mix it up so it is not all the same type: some action games, some puzzles, some driving ones, etc.  So you don't have to be in the top 15 out of all 3,000 to get featured, its more like the top one or two out of the style of game you make, so say the top 2 out of 500.

2 in 500 aren't great odds.  But the potential payoff if you get that winning ticket is immense.

So I'll keep playing the app game...


Thursday, May 7, 2015

Gestures

A few years ago, checking your phone while at dinner with someone would've been considered pretty rude.  But not so much any more.

There's really a formula to it, the more people in the group, the less rude it is to check your phone.  It drops quickly to "normal behavior" once the group has 3 or 4 members.

Now, checking your watch (Apple Watch) sends the message you have somewhere else to be.  But I bet that changes too, as more and more people have watches and devices that show their messages and emails.  Glancing at the screen, then getting out the iPhone only if it's something more important than the people you're with.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Is the App Store really this fucked?

One of our apps, Contact Clean Pro, jumped up to nearly the top 50 in Productivity.


The day it jumped up wasn't a particularly good day for it, selling 4 copies.  The recent best was a couple weeks ago when it sold 13(!), about the time it was at very bottom of the top 200 graph above.

So for iPhone Productivity apps, any app that is out of the top 200 is selling single digit copies a day at best.  So of the thousands and thousands of productivity apps, most are making virtually nothing.  With a very large percent making absolutely nothing.

But the lucky 10 or so at the top are likely selling hundreds or thousands of copies a day.

Apple Watch vs Battery

I wanted to get an idea for the size of the Apple Watches, so looked for similar every day objects.

AAA batteries are a pretty good match!

  • All models of the watch are exactly the same thickness as a triple-a battery.  
  • Three AAA batteries together are a little longer and a little thinner than the bigger 42mm Apple Watch.
  • Those same three batteries are about the same weight as the watch part of the Sport model, 33 vs 30 grams (for all, bands add more.)  
  • The steel model weighs in the middle between 4 and 5 AAA batteries.
  • The gold model weighs the same as 6 AAA batteries.